Initiatives

Rutgers University-Newark Middle East Music Orchestra

The Middle East Music Orchestra was funded by a Chancellor’s Seed Grant and provides opportunity for study, exploration, and performance of various genres of Middle Eastern music in its broadest sense, as well as collaboration with the community, scholars and students in the interdisciplinary Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies program.

The underlying focus of the orchestra is on the theoretical and practical aspects of maqam, the principal musical modal system associated with this region of the world. Through its work, the orchestra performs classical, modern, and popular genres from the Middle East and North Africa, in classical, devotional, folk, and urban forms. The repertoire includes instrumental and vocal pieces, sung in a variety of languages that reflect the centuries-long interaction of Arab, Turkish, Persian, Armenian, Greek, Kurdish, Assyrian, and Sephardic Jewish cultures in the region. The Middle East Music Orchestra is based on inclusive culture of collaboration across artistic and academic disciplines, embracing the Rutgers community’s diversity and demonstrating its rich cultural potential – telling the Rutgers Newark story through performances, research, and learning.

The orchestra members perform on traditional instruments such as oud, ney, tanbur, lute, percussion (bendir, riqq, darbukkah), santur, qanun, saz, baglama, rebab, as well as violin, clarinet, cello, viola, double bass, and other instruments tuned to modal scales. The repertoire includes instrumental and vocal pieces, often sung in a variety of languages reflecting the diversity of cultures in the region: Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Armenian, Greek, Kurdish, Assyrian, and Ladino. The orchestra investigates the touching points and historical overlap with other musical traditions, including South Asian, Spanish, Portuguese, Central Asian, and Eastern European, and engages them in innovative cross-cultural performance and artistic explorations. Working with melody, rhythm, poetry, and structure of modal music, the participants perform the compositions and improvisations drawing attention to the distinct cultural elements as the starting point in a re-imagined environment of twenty first century’s global synthesis.

The Middle East Music Orchestra promotes interaction with the greater Newark community through performances at Rutgers-Newark and citywide, as well as participation open to university and community members.

The RU-N Middle East Music Orchestra director, Ahmet Erdogdular is renowned for his sophisticated singing style and is the sole surviving performer of some of the classical forms of the Ottoman classical tradition. The New York Times deemed his voice “voluptuous and pliable” and his program “intoxicating.” Starting music at an early age, Erdogdular completed his bachelors and master’s degrees in Turkish Classical Music at the Istanbul Technical University State Conservatory, and is a doctoral candidate in Music at the Istanbul University School of Divinity. Ahmet Erdogdular is the president and artistic director of Makam New York, Inc., a non-profit organization for Turkish classical music and arts, and founder of the Annual Turkish Music Institute Workshop. He plays tanbur, lute, oud, and percussion.

Rutgers University-Newark Middle East Music Orchestra

Queer Newark Oral History Project

We are working to tell our community's stories in the words of its trailblazers and legends, by collecting audio-recorded oral history interviews. We hope you enjoy your visit - and consider sharing your own story with one of our trained project staff.

As a community-based and community-directed initiative supported by Rutgers University-Newark, QNOHP is dedicated to preserving the history of LGBTQ people and communities in Newark, New Jersey.

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Lives in Translation

The Lives in Translation program offers undergraduate internships in translation/interpretation serving the Legal Clinics at the Rutgers School of Law-Newark and other sites in the community. Interns participate in weekly training and receive academic credit for their work throughout the semester.

 

a feeling of itself

Critical Studies of Iraq

Critical Studies of Iraq is based at the International Institute for Peace at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rutgers University-Newark led by Professor Zahra Ali, and funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Professor Ali works in coordination with several partners in Iraq including the Iraqi Al-Amal Association under the supervision of Jamal Al-Jawaheri and scholar Ilham Mekki Hammadi, Al-Bayan Center for Planning and Studies under the leadership of Ali Taher Alhammood, and the Iraqi Observatory for Human Rights led by Mustafa Saadoon. The initiative aims to foster, support, and develop the critical scholarship of social scientists and feminists in Iraq. Taking Iraq as framework to theorize from (and not only about), it focuses on the epistemologies and critical knowledge emerging from Iraqi scholars and activists today.

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Rutgers University-Newark Middle East Music Orchestra
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a feeling of itself
Critical Studies of Iraq mural