Three people sit outside in an urban area on stairs. One is reading a black composition notebook, one is seated below the other two, and another is looking over his shoulder.

Foundations of Urban Education Minor Curriculum Outline and Course Descriptions

Students need to complete eighteen credits in order to graduate with the minor. Eighteen credits are required for all minors. Two courses are required within the minor and the rest are suggested elective options students can select from.

 

Course Number

Course Name

Required or Elective

Credits

21:300:292

Social Foundations of Urban Education

Required

3 credits

21:300:295

Adolescent Psychology and the Urban Experience

Required

3 credits

21:300:297, 298, 299

21st Century Educator

Elective

1 credit each=3 credits total

*21:300:334

 

Collaborative Leadership and Social Innovation

Elective

3 credits

*21:300:335

Publicly Engaged Research and Pedagogy

Elective

3 credits

21:512:361

Urban History in the US: Imagining the City

Elective

3 credits

21:512:203

History of Newark

Elective

3 credits

21:290:345

Sociology of Education

Elective

3 credits

21:920:321

Urban Sociology

Elective

3 credits

21:290:324

Inequality

Elective

3 credits

21:526:303

Local Citizenship in a Global World

Elective

3 credits

+21:300:301

Health Disparities: Implications in Urban Communities

Elective

3 credits

*pending approval

The above list of electives is not exhaustive. Please contact Dr. Lynnette Mawhinney, department chair, for additional information on other elective courses to be considered.

Transferability of Credits

We currently offer transfer options for the required courses in the minor from several institutions. See the full Transfer Credits List for more details.

 

Required Course Descriptions

This course examines human development from puberty (10 to 12 years) to physiological maturation (18 to 19 years). The course provides students with an understanding of psychological theories of human development and learning. The primary focus is on the urban adolescent and the urban experience, specifically experiences in urban education.  Teacher candidates examine the relationship between development and learning theories. This course discusses the behaviors and attitudes of urban adolescents and the challenges they face, and how those challenges influence and interact with academic achievement.  Furthermore, understanding moves from theory to practice by examining the differences in the way students receive information and how teachers can transmit information successfully. This course assists teacher candidates to better understand the opportunities and challenges they will face in an urban school.

This course examines the relationship between schools and society. Through an exploration of the scholarly field of social foundations (history, philosophy, and sociology of education) students explore the dynamic interaction between dominant ideology, political economy, and changes in American public schooling since its inception.  Special attention is given to the ideal relationship between democracy and urban schooling.  Students complete twenty hours of hands-on experience, including a minimum of six hours, with the Abbott Leadership Institute.

Elective Course Descriptions

This hybrid course provides an overview of the essential components of meeting not only the academic needs of English Language Learners (ELLs), but also understanding how language and cultural awareness impact the delivery of instruction. We begin by examining the groundwork of the Bilingual Education Act and various cases brought before the Supreme Court. We also take a look at both the implication and application that federal and state laws have within the school districts. Next, we examine second language acquisition theories in order to build a deeper understanding of the academic needs of ELLs. The course concludes by exposing and providing you with the opportunity to both evaluate and implement strategies and techniques to address the academic and cultural needs of ELLs.

 

This hybrid course is designed to provide an overview of both students with disabilities and gifted learners. We discuss the special education process while focusing on various types of learners, evidence-based instructional strategies, and legal policies (6A:14) in meeting students' needs. In addition, you will explore how gifted education works on a strength model rather than a remedial one. We will discuss how the roles and responsibilities of the teacher working with gifted students must continually aim to provide proper challenges.

The purpose of the literacy strand is to introduce students to theory and research in adolescent literacy, how it will influence their career practice, and strategies to incorporate literacy into instructional strategies and materials. Particular attention is given to the difference between discipline and content area literacy, the significance of academic vocabulary, and strategies and methods for teaching literacy in all content areas to students with diverse learning needs.

This writing intensive course utilizes an ontological inquiry informed by rhetoric, philosophy, neuroscience, and linguistics to explore stories we make up about who we are, who others are, and what is possible in our world.  We discover how such stories limit our leadership and we gain access to any way of being and acting to be effective in any circumstance.  We discover how participating fully out here with others is key to exercising collaborative leadership and social innovation in any field of endeavor. 

This course explores ontological inquiry as a powerful pedagogical innovation for preparing effective publicly engaged scholars.  We will assess the effectiveness of ontological inquiry using novel research approaches such as phenomenology, the post-qualitative approach termed thinking with theory and arts-based qualitative inquiry. If you are committed to a career that makes a positive difference in the world, you are likely considering publicly engaged scholarship:  scholarship that works with (not on) community members toward the generation of new possibilities in the world.  This can occur in the fields   of social work, criminal justice, education, business, environmental sciences, political science, art, media, journalism, computer science, public transportation, any field where you actively collaborate with the public.  As you may know, Rutgers University Newark collectively created a strategic vision that includes publicly engaged scholarship as a central focus.   

The purpose of this course is to examine the complex interactions among the significant class and ethnic health disparities.  Quality of life is the outcome of micro and macro-factors that operate at the level of the individual, family, neighborhood, community, state, and nation. A multidisciplinary framework is used for examining the evidence on the linkage between development of human capital, poverty, sociopolitical organization, and community organization.

College and class. Who goes to college and which colleges do they attend? What does your family’s income have to do with the probability that you will graduate from college? Why does it make a difference whether other members of your household went to college? We explore these issues in the context of your own experiences. How did you get here, and where are you going? We also read sociological reports and novels, and watch films that take us from birth through to the post-graduation world of employment. Along the way we pay close attention to the role that a college education plays in determining your future.

In this course, we’ll ask specific questions about inequality, regarding its origins, the shapes and forms it takes in everyday life, its consequences, and the overall impact it has on society. We’ll explore how social scientists interpret and explain inequality, mainly from sociological perspectives, but we’ll also include some political and economic perspectives. We’ll consider inequality as a result of race, ethnicity, and gender divisions. We’ll include the historical roots of social organization and consider problems related to inequalities in industrialized as well as less developed countries. We’ll study the institutionalization of inequalities and the patterns that reproduce and maintain them. Finally, starting from the question why we go along with inequalities, we’ll explore some approaches that aim to address and challenge inequalities in our society. 

This course discusses the development and importance of cities, theories of urban growth, and contemporary problems facing American cities. Throughout the course we’ll draw critical relationship between social theory and the empirical world of urban experience. The course will use city as a lens to examine history, social relations, problems, and conflicts of the larger social structure in which it is located. Throughout the course city will be seen simultaneously as a social, a cultural, and a political economic phenomenon, with particular attention to the following: a) historical analysis of pre- and post-industrialization, theories of urbanization, and the place of the city in the modernizing process; b) theories of international migration and comparative immigration in global cities; c) historical changes in urban space (i.e., urban renewal, suburbanization, and "gentrification") and their relationship to wealth, poverty, and homelessness in American society; d) the city as a locus of ethnic, racial, gender, and class relations, interactions, and conflicts; e) urban poverty, housing, segregation policies; f) strategies of urban "revitalization" and the future of the "postmodern" city; g) globalization and economic restructuring in contemporary cities in the U.S. and abroad.

Former Newark mayor Ken Gibson was once quoted as saying “Wherever the central cities are going, Newark is going to get there first.” This course will examine the 350+ year history of Newark and explore to what extent Gibson’s statement was accurate. Our goal will to be to gain an understanding of both the critical events that shaped the city specifically and to engage in the narrative threads that have defined urban development in the United States more broadly. We will explore such topics as the city’s Puritan foundations, the impact of industrialization, the origins and definition of the city’s civil unrest in 1967, and the sources of its current troubles and successes. Finally, we will look to connect Newark’s story to other localities in New Jersey. By the end of the course, students will hopefully see that even if they are not from Newark, the city’s story intersects with the history of the state, region, and country.

Ever notice how we generalize about cities? New York is crowded but exciting. Chicago is dangerous. Paris is romantic, but Baltimore is charming. How do we get these ideas about these places? Where do they come from and how do they shape our understanding of the places we live in? In this course, we will examine how U.S. cities have been imagined from the late 19th Century into the early 21st Century. Ideas about cities are powerful. They shape what laws get passed and what policies are made, which changes the cities we live in. In turn, they shape how we see the world around us. We will pay particular attention to the differences between images created by policymakers, politicians, and city officials and those by artists, activists and regular people. We will look at a variety of primary sources, from postcards to film to maps, to see what people in these eras thought about cities. We will also look at change over time. How did, for example, industrialization, deindustrialization, and suburbanization shape cities? While examining these broad issues, we will stay attentive to the lived experiences of people, as well. Cities are very different places, depending on your race, ethnicity, religion, class, gender, and sexuality. One of our key questions will be: who is the city for?