ANTHROPOLOGY

21:070: 314:B5 DRUGS AND SOCIETY - Robert Siebert

Description Forthcoming

21:070:314:B6 MUSIC AND SOCIETY - Robert Siebert

Description Forthcoming

SOCIOLOGY

21:920:310:H5 OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS - Robert Siebert

Variations in cultural definitions of work, attitudes toward careers, and the social environment of work; the development of professions; occupational and professional recruitment.

21:920:321:B5 URBAN SOCIOLOGY - Jesse Liss

Urban sociology is the study of everyday city life from a sociological perspective. The content of the course will be divided into two sections, (1) to introduce you to a theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between “globalization” and urban life, (2) to introduce you to some topics in the broad field of urban sociology. In the first part of the semester we will examine how processes of “globalization” condition urban geography in the United States and Latin America and the Caribbeanusing sociological categories of class, race, gender, citizenship, space and place, and state and market. In the second part of the semester we will discuss some popular and relevant topics in the field with focus on local areas and issues. These may include: segregation; migration and immigration; criminal justice and criminology; urban education; gender, sexuality, and city life; employment and work; environment and public health; natural disasters; public housing. This online course relies on assigned readings and films, voice narrated powerpoint lectures and slides, and news and media. Students are evaluated based on participation in online discussion boards and two essays (midterm and final).

21:920:393:B5 MUSIC AND SOCIOLOGY - Robert Siebert

Crosslisted with 21:070:314:B6

21:920:393:H5 MASS INCARCERATION - Jesse Liss

A full title of the course would be: “Race, Mass Incarceration, and Mass Deportation in the United States.” As such the course is divided into three parts, (1) sociological theories of race and racism, (2) sociological perspectives of race and mass incarceration in the US, and (3) sociological perspectives of race and mass deportations in the US. This online course relies on assigned readings and films, voice narrated powerpoint lectures and slides, and news and media. Students are evaluated based on participation in online discussion boards and two essays (midterm and final).

21:920:394:B5 DRUGS AND SOCIETY - Robert Siebert

Crosslisted with 21:070:314:B5

21:920:394:H5 MIGRATION AND CRIME - Jesse Liss

The course is not intended to be a comprehensive overview of the study of migration and crime. Rather, we will use critical criminology to have a rigorous discussion about certain immigration trends in the US, and within a global context. As we will mostly be using critical criminological theories, the course has an admitted bias to the study of migration and crime. The course is divided into four interrelated topics, they are: (1) rising global inequality and migration from poor to rich countries, (2) the criminalization of migration to the US, (3) the feminization of migration, (4) mass deportations in the US and their social impacts. These topics are analyzed using sociological categories of class, race, gender, culture, citizenship, and their intersections. This online course relies on assigned readings and films, voice narrated powerpoint lectures and slides, and news and media. Students are evaluated based on participation in online discussion boards and two essays (midterm and final).

21:920:409:HQ CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY - Robert Siebert

Foundations of social theory; Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, and other contributors to major orientations in the nature and historical development of modern society in the Western world.

21:920:435:B5 IMMIGRANT MINORITIES IN THE US - Jamie Lew

Description Forthcoming