Luis Rivera

Luis Rivera

Email

luis [at] psychology.rutgers.edu

Phone

973-353-5995

Office Location

Office: Psychology Department, Smith Hall Room 327, 101 Warren Street, Newark, NJ 07102

Lab: Smith Hall Room 316, 973-353-3929


Office Hours

Friday 8:45AM-9:45 AM

Research Initiatives

My experimental research investigates the implicit social cognitive processes underlying stereotyped attitudes and how these processes shape the self, identity, and health of stigmatized individuals. My research elucidates the contextual and motivational factors that shape individuals’ stereotyped-based cognition about themselves and others occurring outside of conscious awareness, control, and intention. My research has implications for the development and maintenance of stigmatized individuals’ social identities, the expression of implicit (and explicit) stereotyping and prejudice and their relation to discriminatory behavior, and the presence and persistence of health disparities between members of socially advantaged and disadvantaged groups.



Publications

Rivera, L. M., & Veysey, B. (in press).  Implicit self-criminal cognition and its relation to criminal behavior. Law and Human Behavior

Sachs, N., Veysey, B., & Rivera, L. M. (in press). Implicit social cognitive processes underlying victim self and identity: Evidence with college-aged adults.  Journal of Interpersonal Violence. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260517741625

Villicana, A., Rivera, L. M., & Garcia, D. (in press).  When one’s group is beneficial: The effect of a group-affirmation and subjective group identification on prejudice.  Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.  https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1368430217690907

Rivera, L. M., & Dasgupta, N. (2018). The detrimental effect of affirming masculinity on judgments of gay men. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 19, 102-116. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/men0000074

Baćak, V., Thurman, K., Eyer, K., Qureshi, R., Bird, J., Rivera, L. M., & Kim, S. A. (2018). Incarceration and health of sexual and gender minority persons.  American Journal of Public Health, 108(8), 994-999. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2018.304500